Course Descriptions

2020 EMS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Armored Vehicle Rescue

Armored Vehicles have become a necessity rather than a rarity with Tactical units. The vast variants of the units out there created the needed for this training. Many teams have Armor but have rarely used it to it’s potential.  This lack the training or limited operational use can create liability issues to the their team and agency. The training cover the Armor’s capability, limitations, and safety issues when working in and around the units. The rescue operations, elevated Tactics, Breaching, less lethal and communications use with a vehicle that weighs between 15 and 20 tons must be addressed long before it is used operationally. Students will run dry and live fire drills and exercises in the operator and safety officer during the course time frame. Practical exercise participation will be required for successfully completion of the course.

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM & PRACTICAL
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: All Tactical Operations Gear,Hearing and Eye Protection, Primary and Secondary Weapons and 100 rds. for each, Simminition or other NLTA systems, Ballistic Shield (if Available).


Executive Protection Medical Operations

This introduction course is specifically built hands on for the protection professional. During this
course we address a variety of issues you may face while performing protection details both
inside and outside of the United States. We provide gear solutions for team members who are
constantly on the move and even situations that may require long term care, i.e. extended care
after injuries from natural disasters or even sudden illness. In addition to treating clients for
medical issues, we will also discuss how to better take care of YOU, the protection professional
in order to maximize your performance, enhancing your protection capabilities.
This course will be lead by our Director Emergency Medicine, bringing over 15 years of real
world emergency and travel medicine. He has extensive experience as an expedition physician in
areas of Asia, Central and South America, and Europe. He is responsible for consulting directly
with our clients and coordinating with our specialist partners, assisting with all travel medicine
and evacuation needs. He conducts pre-trip medical screening, helping to integrate clients
personal medical profiles with specific medical intelligence in the areas where our clients travel.


Course Topics Include:
• Introduction to TCCC
• Approach to the injured client
• Blast injury patterns
• Approach to a mass casualty
• Trip medical planning and evacuation
• Evacuations
• Handoffs and medical communication
• Travel medicine
• Personal med packs

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: NONE


Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion and Advanced Resuscitative Care In The Pre-hospital Setting

Explore the current recommendations and guidelines related to stabilizing, monitoring and transporting the hemorrhaging patient in the pre-hospital setting. Learn or refamiliarize yourself in advanced hemorrhage control and resuscitation to include junctional tourniquets, REBOA , fresh whole blood transfusion and hypothermia prevention.  Review lessons learned from Military, EMS and Austere medicine in a combination lecture, discussion and hands on format.

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: NONE


Human Terrain Mapping and Behavior Pattern Recognition for First Responders

Human Terrain Mapping & Behavior Pattern Recognition 4-hr Workshop HTMBPR is designed for the 21st Century Law Enforcement Professional. It focuses on advanced critical thinking using an understanding of human behavior patterns to articulate and defend decisions made by the officer in the course of their duties. It is designed to empower the law enforcement officer and limit department/organization liability while simultaneously building community rapport and engagement. This purpose of this workshop is to give insight into what the HTMBPR program is and how it can be applied.

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: NONE


Intro to Tactical Rope Rescue Class

THIS CONFERENCE SESSION IS DESIGNED TO MAKE ATTENDEES AWARE OF HOW FORMAL TRAINING CAN DRAMATICALLY IMPROVE THEIR SKILL SET FOR TACTICAL VERTICAL ACCESS AND RESCUE.
 
Safety Protocols and Guidelines
a) Safety is Our #1 Priority
i. Flat Ground practice before ever going vertical
ii. Safety/Belay line or “Fireman Safety” will always be utilized
iii. Instructors will do a safety check of students’ equipment before going vertical to insure the gear is donned, assembled and being used correctly
iv. All students are safety officers, check yourself and your partners before approaching the edge
v. An edge restraint device will be used to prevent an accidental fall while working near the edge
vi. Report any gear malfunctions or damage to an instructor
vii. Report any injuries to an instructor
b) Safety Briefs – Morning and Afternoon session
c) Rappel commands (i.e. “on belay”, “on rappel”, etc.)
i. Voice commands are utilized when going vertical. The appropriate signals will be taught and utilized during all phases of the course
d) Weapons Check before rappelling evolutions, NO LOADED WEAPONS  
e) On Site Medical Aid / Trauma Kits Location(s)
f) Nearest Hospital Information
 
Course History and Overview
a) Traditional rope access courses have followed a standard “NFPA” safety format that do not address new technologies and/or end user requirements. Improvements in material science has led to lighter weight gear that is as strong as traditional heavy gear. TRAC focus is on providing end users the ability to try some of the lighter weight gear.
b) TRAC instructors recognize that many times the end user’s primary or secondary job description may not include rope skills, so the training is oriented to reduce the memorization of numerous complicated knots etc, that under operational stress and environmental conditions will be difficult to recall.
c) The course is “Tactical Rope Access” and provides students with more than just rappelling skills but teaches how to use these skills to solve numerous operational scenarios.
 
Course History
a) Needs and Skills Analysis
b) Development Approach
c) Training Methodology
 
Rope Access Standards
a) NFPA Guidelines, JPRs and AHJ
b) Demystifying NFPA and what it means to you
c) SPRAT, IRATA, Recreational
 
Knots and Hitches
A) Figure 9
B) Double Bight Bowline
C) Bowline
D) Bowline with Yosemite Finish
E) Rigging Bowline
F) Alpine Butterfly
G) Munter Hitch
H) Offset Bound Overhand
I) Frost Knot

Single Point Anchors
a) Anchors
b) Rigging with webbing and slings
c) Basket Hitch
d) Wrap 2 Pull 4
e) Meat anchors
f) Contingency- Rig to Lower, Rig to Raise
 
Descent Devices
a) Figure 8
b) GriGri
c) Totem
d) Others- Munter
 
Vertical Descent - Rappels
a) Friction is your friend and enemy
b) Controlled smooth descent, not bounding
C) Low profile “Tactical” entry into rappel to reduce silhouetting and target profile

Edge Transition
a) Sitting to reduce target profile
b) Pre-rig device so it rests over the edge, tie off
c) Lower self onto device
 
Belays
a) Firemen
b) Members on Top
c) Self-Belay
d) Buddy Belay

 Vertical Descent - Lowers
a) Belay Device
b) Munter
c) 2 Carabiner Munter for Heavier team members, members carrying extra equipment, or lowering heavy gear.
d) Contingency Rig to Lower anchor, tied off, unite and lower
 
Mechanical Advantage and Raising Systems
a) Overview
i. In event member is stuck on rope, raise back to roof, etc.
b) Mechanical Advantage of using rope grabs, pulleys, carabiners, progressive capture devices to raise a load- injured team member, civ casualty, evidence etc
i) 1:1, Z-rig simple 3:1 , complex 5:1,
c) Passing knots and converting raise to lower and vice versa

 Bailouts
a) Overview
i) Hasty exit from anything above floor level when an immediate emergency develops and team members must exit rapidly
b) Devices and Techniques


COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM & PRACTICAL
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: Rappel Harness, Gloves, helmet, boots, and BDU uniform. Extra training harnesses will be available for use.


K-9 Medical Operations

K-9s fill a vital role in many departments across the country being used in almost every aspect of the first responder's field. We most commonly see their use in assisting SWAT with the execution of high-risk warrants, EOD technicians with scans during event security or even patrol dogs being placed into immediate action with tracking fleeing suspects. The bottom line is we place our    K-9s into higher threats on a daily basis without thinking twice about what care we can provide them when a medical emergency arises. Every day these K-9s are placed on the front lines but what pre-veterinary care is available to them? K-9 Medical Operations provides a tactical approach to the treatment of these K-9s, to bring the care they receive up to par with how we would care for their human counterpart, because at the end of the day, all though they are dogs, they are our undoubtedly our partners.

Topics include basic and advanced medical procedures, K9 anatomy, transport, legal issues and policy considerations which will allow the implementation for a program in your departments. Blue Team Tactics is comprised of several subject matter experts all with very diverse backgrounds to address these issues from multiple viewpoints.

 

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: NONE


Mass Casualty Incidents

 

 

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: NONE


NAEMT Tactical Combat Casaulty Care (TCCC)

The 8-hour course is focused is to train first responders to handle emergency
situations seconds after they happen. This course contains lectures and hands-on skill
station scenarios, by trained certified instructors, designed to expose the student to a
variety of different emergency situations and confidently provide appropriate care.
The course includes care under-fire concepts, tactical field care, and tactical
evacuation care. Additionally, we will go over the equipment checklist for first
responders, bleeding control & tourniquet use, and movement of an aided casualty.
Course topics will also include use QuikClot and hemostats, airway trauma and
treatments, chest trauma and treatments, hypothermia, and fractures and splinting.


This class includes an NAEMT, 8-hour certification card.

 

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM & PRACTICAL
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: NONE


NAEMT Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC)

The 2nd edition of NAEMT's Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) course teaches EMS practitioners and other prehospital providers how to respond to and care for patients in a civilian tactical environment.


The course presents the three phases of tactical care and integrates parallel EMS nomenclature:


•    Hot Zone/Direct Threat Care that is rendered while under attack or in adverse conditions.
•    Warm Zone/Indirect Threat Care that is rendered while the threat has been suppressed but may resurface at any point.
•    Cold Zone/Evacuation Care that is rendered while the casualty is being evacuated from the incident site.
The 16-hour classroom course includes all new patient simulations and covers the following topics:
•    Hemorrhage control including immediate action drills for tourniquet application throughout the course;
•    Complete coverage of the MARCH assessment;
•    Surgical airway control and needle decompression;
•    Strategies for treating wounded responders in threatening environments;
•    Caring for pediatric patients;
•    Techniques for dragging and carrying victims to safety; and
•    A final, mass-casualty/active shooter event simulation.


NAEMT's TECC course is endorsed by the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma, is consistent with the current guidelines established by the Committee on TECC (Co-TECC), and meets all of the updated National Tactical Emergency Medical Support Competency Domains. This course is accredited by CAPCE for 16 hours of continuing education credit, and recognized by NREMT.


NAEMT is a recognized education partner of the Co-TECC. The Co-TECC establishes guidelines for the provision of prehospital care to injured patients during a tactical incident. The Co-TECC neither creates curriculum for the prehospital provider, nor does it endorse the curriculum of other organizations.

 

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM & PRACTICAL
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: Full kit optional


Rescue Task Force

 

 

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: NONE


STORM Medical Provider TEMS Class Introduction

 

 

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: NONE


Travel Medicine

This course is designed to provide basic information to the everyday CONUS and OCONUS traveler. The course content will provide open source resources that will help educate the traveler on his or her destination, creating a better understanding of the medical preparation and local in country emergency capabilities. We will discuss appropriate medicines for travel, emergency evacuation plans, pre-trip planning, in country medical emergencies, medical screenings, and much more.

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: NONE


Warm Zone Rapid Victim Extraction

Learn and apply methodologies of Victim rescue in a mass casualty event utilizing multiple methods to include ballistic shields, webbing, carries. Understand differences in tactics in hot, warm, and cold zones. Identify and understand current threats faced by first responders in mass casualty environments and how it dictates what gear we use.

 

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM & PRACTICAL
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: NONE


WMD Medical Class - Masters of Chaos-Surviving the Unknown

A look at environmental threats and medical considerations that First Responders could be confronted with in their day-to-day operations. As Police, Fire and EMS personnel drive headlong into the unknown world that follows the initial call to act, this class will expose them to emerging threats, ways to use personal monitoring equipment to keep them safe and medical treatments considerations for both cold and hot zone operations.

 

COURSE TYPE: CLASSROOM
EQUIPMENT NEEDED: NONE